Kong Bak Pau (Braised Pork Bun) – 扣肉包


 Today, I was thinking that I could possibly go for a little indulgence after a week of eating clean.

I had this when I was in Taiwan and they do it a little different from us here. The whole combination in the mouth is just crazy awesome!

I served this at a mini gathering and my friend had 4! Yes it’s that good….

Ingredients:

For Meat Braising
1 kg of pork belly
1 cinnamon stick
3 star anise
1 tbsp five spice powder
2 tsp ground pepper
2-4 tbsp of good dark soya sauce (depending on the saltiness and colour intensity of the soya sauce used)
50g rock sugar
salt to taste
water as required

Condiments and Garnishing
200g pickled greens (酸菜) (do not use salted vege (咸菜)]
coriander leaves (芫荽叶)
1-2 heads of chinese lettuce (生菜)

White steam bun

Method

1. Add whole slab of pork belly. Let it come to a boil before lowering flame to medium low and cook for 15-20 min.

2. Leave to cool down. Discard pork belly cooking water.

3. When it has cooled down to be handled, cut the pork belly slab into large pieces (size good to put into the bun).

4. In a deep pot, add pork belly slices and water to cover the pork belly by about 1 inch or so. Let the water come to a boil. Skim off any scum on the surface of the water before add all the other meat braising ingredients.

5. Let the mixture come to a boil once more before lowering flame, cover with lid and let it simmer for 30 min.

6. After 30 min, taste the sauce and adjust with more soya sauce, five-spice powder, pepper, sugar or salt as required. The aroma of five-spice powder should be strong.

7. Test the texture of the meat slices and continue to boil for another 20-30 min under very low heat until the meat pieces are thoroughly soft and wobbly. Actual cooking time depends on the thickness of the slabs and texture desired.

8. Sandwich the braised pork belly slabs between steamed chinese white buns and chinese lettuce. Garnish with pickled vegetables and coriander leaves. Serve.

P.s you can sprinkle some grated peanut sugar mix on top. That’s how the serve it in Taiwan. I left that out but it’s personal preference 😊

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